How to Meter by Eye (Aka Guessing an Exposure)

Light meter

An old light meter

Check out all of our other how-to guides here.

One question that I guess asked often is : How to I meter by eye? I’ve got an old film camera that doesn’t have a light meter!

Although light meters are everywhere nowadays in digital cameras, learning to meter by eye is still one of the most useful skills a photographer can learn. Yes, I know that your camera probably has TTL metering with all the fancy algorithms, but many of the world’s “best” cameras do not have one (I’m looking at you guys, Leica and Hasselblad). Not only will you be able to use a Leica M4 with ease, but even if you just own a digital camera, it surely doesn’t hurt to know how to meter by eye. [Read more…]

The Photograph IO Hiatus

Dear Photograph IO readers,

The past few months have been extremely busy for me. Hold on.

I started this blog during my spare time this summer, and I never expected for it to grow so quick nor it to be so time-consuming; I never expected to have nearly 50 000 visitors during that downtime, yet those visitors are nearly all due to search engine traffic. While I was studying, you readers were being disappointed for the lack of content. I deeply apologize for this near 3 month hiatus during which no content whatsoever came on the blog. Sorry guys.

Does it mean that I will start again to write daily on Photograph IO? Probably not. But I will at least make the effort to contribute weekly to this blog. Maybe more of personal thoughts, and less of tutorials/how-to’s. And this is the first article.

Searching

Searching for what? Prague, Czech Republic

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Photography Tips and Tricks #6: Shoot in Live View on Tripod

San Francisco Cityscape

San Francisco Cityscape by David Yu (Flickr)

For more quick photography tips and tricks like this one, click here.

Although the real-time optical finder in DSLR’s is hugely useful, there are times where using Live View is a wiser choice. While walkaround photography is perfectly suited to quick OVF (and EVF’s), slow-paced photography on a tripod is better done with an LCD in Live view mode. Why? [Read more…]

Fujifilm X100T Annoucement : A Roundup of Features

Fujifilm X100T

With the release of the X100, the company’s first flagship compact, about three years ago, Fujifilm established its turnover from a dying film company to a reputation of making high-quality photography equipment with photographers in mind. After the release of the X100S that corrected many of the initial X100S quirks nearly two years ago, Fuji is back in the market with a new model, the X100T, better than ever before. [Read more…]

My Debut into Film Photography

Minolta X700

Minolta X700 w/ 35-70 f/3.5 macro lens, my new camera. Ironically, I used a Kodak Ultramax 400 VSCO preset on this picture.

First of all, sorry for all you regular Photograph IO readers for blogging so scarcely these days. School just started and everyone is busy, but I’ll still try to do my best and keep up with at least 3/4 articles per week. Stay tuned! That being said, this article has a more personal, intimate style that would perhaps be better suited to be on some personal blog, but for the sake of it, I’ve decided to post it in Photograph IO for those who are interested…

Like most amateurs photographers today, digital photography has been with me from the start. Although I did know people who owns and shoots film, I had never manipulated that medium myself. And so I shot digital for over 5 years, ever since the beginning of my path down photography. However, film photography always intrigued me. Maybe it’s because of that so-called tonal rendition, or dynamic range, or that ubiquitous film grain, or maybe out of pure curiosity? No matter what the reason was, the film look had a profound appeal on me. I bought some VSCO. Is it good? Hell yeah. But I still had to try the experience of shooting real film. I still had to explore the vast world of film photography… [Read more…]

How to Shoot Stail Trails : A Beginner’s Guide

Check out all of our other how-to guides here.

Long exposures are one of the most popular, and stunning forms of photography, because they often embody a sense of motion in a single photograph. What if you combine long exposures (as in, very, very long) with astrophotography? Star trails are one of the most mesmerizing things you can photograph using just about standard equipment. Although the theory is very simple (you simply need to shoot a 30 minute exposure, right?), it is much harder to master in practice.

[Read more…]

RAW vs JPEG: A Visual Comparison Using Real-World Examples

RAW vs JPEG: A Visual Comparison Using Real-World Examples

One of the hottest debates in the world of photography, probably on par, it not even more debated than Canon vs Nikon, is the one between RAW and JPEG. The former is a lossless, direct output of the camera’s sensor data while the latter is a lossy compressed version of an already “cooked” photograph.

While most photographers recommend shooting RAW for any serious work due to its format retaining all information, there are tons of misinformation and preconceptions about this topic on the web. Instead of making a direct comparison in this article, I’ll let you judge by yourself the difference between RAW and JPEG using actual photographs. [Read more…]